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Monday, February 16, 2009

Bouncing Boxes & Sparkling Snowflakes


Today was our first day of sampling in the field. It was a gorgeous day for Churchill in February...only -20 and no wind. I layered up in my six layers plus heat packs, goggles, balaclava and Arctic pants, loaded all the research equipment and data sheets and headed out to get in the "sled." Somehow when they told me we would be riding in wooden boxes pulled behind the back of a snowmobile I didn't really envision a WOODEN BOX TOWED BEHIND A SNOWMOBILE! :) That is exactly what it was! Four of us piled into each BOX, claimed a cushion if we could, and off we went. Ow...

We were divided into teams of three at each sampling site where we had to dig a pit and investigate the various layers of snow. For each layer we had to measure depth, temperature, density and compressibility, as well as analyze the type of snow particles and their size within each layer. Then we had to take 11 core samples, noting depth and weight of the snow core, and bringing three of the samples back to the lab to measure conductivity and pH. We then moved to another location within the site and repeated the process. The photo is of our second snow pit, with thermometers placed at 5cm intervals in the layers. Our location today was a Borrow Pit, a site that was excavated at one point. One of the things we are looking at there is the effects of anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem. What does that mean?
Tomorrow our plan is to go to two different sites, where we will go through all the above steps again... That means I will take 44 core samples tomorrow!!! No complaining about how many times you have to go to your field research sites! :)
On Thursday, you must go to Tutorial in Mr. Wilson's room, P-38. This is mandatory! Your blog challenge due Wednesday is as follows:
1. Define what "anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem" means and give one example.
2. Come up with two GREAT questions for me, Dr. Pete, or my Shell Inc. teammates. On Thursday you will be able to speak to me LIVE (I know how much you miss me!) and I want some good questions from you! The video conference is an excellent opportunity for you to earn some extra credit if you do more than the required showing up! ;)
This blog challenge should be turned in to Ms. Duffy AND sent to me by clicking "comment."
Talk to you soon...

53 Comments:

At February 16, 2009 at 8:45 PM , Anonymous 3- Alyssa Wood said...

1. Anthropogenic changes refer to the changes in study of the orgins of humanity and how it came to be on earth. Back in the time of Charles Darwin, his theory of Eveolution served as a major anthropogenic idea in modern history.
2. Questions:
a. What did you find in the 44 samples of core that you tested? What did you expect to find originally?
b. What anthropogenic changes on the ecosystem did you discover while doing your research?

 
At February 16, 2009 at 8:51 PM , Anonymous 1- Kayla Wood said...

1. Anthropotic changes means the changes in the study of human orgins. Examples to this could be related to the discoveries of Charles Darwin. His theory, to some people, serve as a major anthropotic change in history.
2. Questions:
a. Of the samples sent back to the lab to measure conductivity and pH, what results did you and the team discover? Were you surprised by what you found?
b.What anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem did you find?

 
At February 16, 2009 at 9:21 PM , Anonymous 1- Aulbree Cook said...

1. Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem are changes in the environment because of humans. An example would be global warming. The melting of glaciers is changing where polar bears are being allowed to live.
2. Do you have any interesting stories about people traveling on the land because of changes in climate? What is the single most effective way to reduce global warming? What are the most unanswered questions about climate change? Are you more optimistic or pessimistic about the future in global warming? That’s 4 Ms. Stafne!! I deserve extra credit!!! 

 
At February 17, 2009 at 12:59 AM , Blogger mmoore0803 said...

Are those cooking thermometers or marks of depth in the snow pack?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:52 AM , Anonymous octreehugger said...

Thank you so much for keeping us informed, the pictures are great. Shell Oil and global warming, is there a connection?? :) I love your stories keep them coming!

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:03 AM , Blogger octreehugger said...

Hi,
I love your stories of your travels: red fox, female gray wolf, the permafrost! Interesting that Shell Oil is involved, perhaps it is a scholarhsip other teachers can apply for?? Hope the padding helps with the bouncing boxes!

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:28 AM , Anonymous 3-cgWert said...

1. Define what "anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem" means and give one example.

The effects, processes or materials are those that are derived from human activities, as opposed to those occurring in natural environments without human influence.

Oil spills in the ocean by tankers.

2.I came up with two GREAT questions for you, Dr. Pete, or my Shell Inc. teammates to answer.


Why dose the snow conductivity and pH have to do with the climate?


How are there diferent snow particles? I belived that they are all the same.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 4:16 PM , Anonymous 5- Madison Browning said...

anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem basically means that the anthropology (plants) changes the surrounding ecosystem. For example pine trees are able to survive the cold winter. If there were no trees then the whole ecosystem could be thrown out of proportion. Finally my question is if all the studies point to the direction that many things may die (polar bears) would anything be done by us?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 6:50 PM , Anonymous 3-Chloe Cruse said...

1.Anthropogenic changes in an ecosystem are the changes that are influenced from human beings on nature. One example would be carbon monoxide being released into our atmosphere from automobiles.
2. Have you seen any evidence of climate change? Is it hard working in that cold of weather?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:28 PM , Anonymous 3-Aaron Jones said...

1)Anthropogenic changes are changes that happen because of human activities, instead of those that happen because of natural events.
ex:pollution caused by businesses or industries would change the ecosystem. This isnt a natural change.

2)a) In your blog I read that you were analyzing snow particles. What defines a snow partical?
b) what was the difference in temperature form the highest to the deepest intervals?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:39 PM , Anonymous 1-Michael Pulley said...

1. Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem means the study of where the changes are coming from like climate change.
2. How can you tell what the changes are coming from?
How can you tell how much carbon dioxide there is in the air from all over the world?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:44 PM , Anonymous 5-Tricia Rice said...

"Bouncing Boxes and Sparkling Snowflakes" Blog challenge #5 :)

1.) "anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem" means changes that are human-altered. We have fundamentally altered climate systems and global patterns of ecosystem form, process, and biodiversity. An example would be Cropland Anthromes.

2.) Two questions I have are for Mrs. Stafne! :)
a. What is your favorite part of the trip so far and why?

b. What did you enjoy discovering the most? Are you getting burned out at all, or are you enjoying the whole experience? What was the most interesting thing you have learned?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:44 PM , Anonymous 3 - Danielle Rocco said...

1. Anthropogenic changes in an ecosystem are, changes in an enviroment caused by factors of human activities.

2. A question I have is, why do you have to take so many samples such as 44 to determine things? Why not just a couple in different spots?

Also, what does the conductivity of the ice matter to climate change?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 7:44 PM , Anonymous 2-TREY SENATE said...

BOUNCING BOX'S & SPARKLING SNOWFLAKES

1.
ANTHROPOGENIC CHANGES ON AN ECOSYSTEM MEANS, HUMAN ACTIVITIES HAVE MADE UNWANTED CHANGES TO THE ENVIORMENT.
MY FIRST EXAMPLE OF AN ANTHROPOGENIC CHANGE IS, THE EFFECTS OF IRRIGATION ON LOCAL HUMIDITY. AND MY SECOND EXAMPLE OF AN ATHROPOGENIC EFFECT IS THE EMISSIONS OF CO2 CAUSED FROM BURNING FOSIL FULES, THAT ARE THE CAUSE OF DEFORESTATION.
2.
QUESTION 1- FOR THE SHELL TEAM.
WILL SHELL CONTINUE TO BRING TEAMS LIKE YOURS TO DO THIS TYPE OF RESEARCH AFTER THIS FIELD STUDY?
QUESTION 2- FOR MS.STAFNE,
IS THIS EXPERIANCE WHAT YOU THOUGHT IT WOULD BE? AND DO YOU THINK THERE MIGHT BE A BETTER WAY TO MEASURE THE ANTHROPOGENIC FACTORS, LIKE WITH COMPUTORS OR SOME OTHER NEW TYPE OF INSTRUMENTS?
QUESTION-3 FOR DR. PETE
ARE YOU ADEQUATELY FUNDED FOR THIS TYPE OF RESEARCH? AND HOW CAN PEOPLE LIKE US HELP?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:07 PM , Anonymous 4- Allie Roy said...

1) Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem means effects, processes or materials are those that are derived from human activities, as opposed to those occuring in natural envioments without human influence. Some examples are industry, mining, construction or also any chemical or biological wastes.

questions for you mrs. stafne :)

1) one quetion I have is why do the polar bears die due to starvation and not just try and live off of food on the ice that hasnt melted?

2) What is the coldest temperature that churchill alone dropped to? maybe showing global warming

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:09 PM , Anonymous 1-Amy Trexler said...

1. "Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem" means human impact on the ecosystem. One example of human impact on the ecosystem is pollution.

2. Will the ecosystems adapt to climate change? How can we prepare for future climate changes?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:13 PM , Anonymous 5 - Kelsey Davidson said...

1. anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem means the results from the influence of human beings on an ecosystem.
carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that is produced directly by human activities, like the burning of fossil fuels is an anthropogenic change on an ecosystem.

2. Shell Inc. Crew - Since the Shell gas company is paying for your trip, it seems like a conflict of interest. But if you were to find out that gas emissions in the air from machinary and vehicles were worse than you thought, and bad enough to make the gas companies change their product:
1) do you think they would spend the money needed to research the problem and create a more afforadable, longer lasting, enviornmentally safe fuel alternative?
or
2) do you think they would continue to basically pump the gases into the air and add onto our problem until another energy or fuel product was created that was proven to show decreases in harmful gases?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:15 PM , Anonymous 3-RandiFullen said...

1. Anthropogenic factors are human activities that change the environment. Human societies over the ages have depleted natural resources and degrading their local environments. Populations have also modified their local climates by cutting down trees or building cities.
2. 1. How do you measure the density in the samples?
2. Does it matter what time of the day to test?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:26 PM , Anonymous 3-raul malfavon said...

an anthropogenic change in an ecosystem is a change in an ecosystem cause by man like the decreased population of trees in the rain forest because people are cutting them down

questions
1. after all your research and eveything is counted up do you think in the next years the out come will be extreamly different why ?
2.if you come face to face with a polor bear what will you do ?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:30 PM , Anonymous 3 - Gavin Andrews said...

1. An anthropogenic change is a change that human activities cause. This change can effect an ecosystem simply by affecting the very complex cycle it has established.
2. a) Have you found a anthropogenic change that you think is incorporated into climate change?
b) Have you seen a polar bear?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:30 PM , Anonymous 3 - Casey Andrews said...

1. An anthropogenic change is a change that human activities cause. This change can effect an ecosystem simply by affecting the very complex cycle it has established.
2. a) Have you found a anthropogenic change that you think is incorporated into climate change?
b) Have you seen a polar bear?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:35 PM , Anonymous 1- Sean Reish said...

1. "anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem" means changes to an ecosystem caused by human activities. These changes are usually negative and an example would be the releasing of gases and dust into the atmosphere, leading to global warming.
2. What EXACTLY are you guys trying to find out up there with your different measurements of snow and ice core samples?
What does the pH of the ice have to do with anything you guys need to know?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 8:36 PM , Anonymous 3-TimArthur said...

1. Anthropogenic changes in an ecosystem is the effect of processes and materials made from humans that effect the natural ecosystems.
2. Why are the pH levels within the ice layers important?
How many layers of ice are present in your location on average?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:05 PM , Anonymous 3-Mersades Hineman said...

Anthropogenic mean the process or matriels that are those that are derived from human activities. some drivers are global, the actual set of interactions that brings about an ecosystem change is more or less specific to a particular place. example is a link between the increasing producer prices and the production growth that can be found in many places throughout the world. why is shell funding the reasearch? are they trying to gather proof or evidence that they have not conrtibuted to climate change. what data, if any, have you collected and has any of it suprised you?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:21 PM , Anonymous 3 - Kellie Rieger said...

1.Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem means the effect humans have on our ecosytem.
2.you should ask your shell employees if there findings with changes there path to fossil fuel.
You shoulod ask Dr. Pete if the the climate change has improved any in the last year since people were notified about global warming and trying to prevent it.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:22 PM , Anonymous 1-Brandon Lai said...

1. Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem is referring to the changes in an ecosystem which were caused by humans. An example of this is when humans go into the forest to cut the trees down. They are changing the natural way in things in the forest, and thus disrupting the ecosystem.
2. I would ask Dr. Pete what he thinks is causing the climate change in Churchill. I would also ask him what he thinks will be the effect of climate change in the next decade in that area.

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:31 PM , Anonymous 1-EvaHinton said...

1.)Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem is the human effects on a ecosystem.
An example could be run-off pollution due to humanity. Also burning of fossil fuels.

2.)How long does it just take to measure the depth, temperature, density and compressibility, of a snow particle as well as analyze the type and their size within each layer?

When you bring core samples back to the lab to measure conductivity and the pH, what do your results tell you?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:41 PM , Anonymous 3 - shaw kobayashi said...

1. Define what "anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem" means and give one example.

Anthropogenic effects, processes or materials are those that are derived from human activities, as opposed to those occurring in natural environments without human influence.

Oil tanks ruining the oceans or the people dumping trash to the ocean.


2.What does the climate change effect the way the surrounding change.

What can we do to fix global warming around the world? should we try to find natural things to run our cars also?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 9:44 PM , Anonymous 5- Brina Carrier said...

1.Define what "anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem" means and give one example.

Anthropogenic change is human caused change in the environment. One example is the barges with trash floating in the ocean, and pollution on land and at shores causing animals to suffer.


2.Come up with two GREAT questions for me, Dr. Pete, or my Shell Inc. teammates. On Thursday you will be able to speak to me LIVE (I know how much you miss me!) and I want some good questions from you! The video conference is an excellent opportunity for you to earn some extra credit if you do more than the required showing up! ;)

NUMERO UNO!
For the shell worker guys: Is the shell oil company paying for their trip up to Winnipeg just to say that they’re “doing what they can to show concern for the environment”? Or are they there because of some other cause (besides volunteer work)?

NUMERO DOS!
For Ms. Stafne: What are you looking for when you examine water crystal shapes? Is there a specific kind of water crystal that forms when it’s frozen with a certain amount of minerals, dirt, etc.?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 10:23 PM , Anonymous Period 1 Hannah McDermott said...

1. Anthropogenic factors are human activities that change the environment.
One example is the CO2 emissions that we are putting into the atmosphere and how it might be changing the earth's climate.

2. Shell: How much CO2 does your company typically put into the atmosphere per year?
Ms.Stafne: What data are you actually collecting? And how?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 10:30 PM , Anonymous 4- jennika said...

1 Anthropogenic is something that is caused or produced by humans. So anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem is defined as the ways we as humans weaken and/or impact the environment and ecosystem. An example of this would be the air pollution, all of the co2 in the air increasing global warming.

Questions:
1 What information are you able to gather by looking at the different ice and snow flakes?
2 What information have you gathered on recent climate change? and is the global warming getting worse?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 10:35 PM , Anonymous 1 - Nick Williams said...

1 - Nick Williams

1: These are changes caused by humans. These can be the results of our waste and careless destruction of the atmosphere with the Carbon-Dioxide emissions from our vehicles.

2: Is it possible to harness energy from Carbon-Dioxide?
How many Polar bears have died to date in comparison towards the time prior Global Warming?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:02 PM , Anonymous 3 - Drew McGann said...

1. Anthropogenic factors are human activities that change the environment. In some cases the chain of causality of human influence on the climate is direct and unambiguous (for example, the effects of irrigation on local humidity), whilst in other instances it is less clear. Various hypotheses for human-induced climate change have been argued for many years though, generally, the scientific debate has moved on from scepticism to a scientific consensus on climate change that human activity is the probable cause for the rapid changes in world climate in the past several decades. Of most concern in these anthropogenic factors is the increase in CO2 levels due to emissions from fossil fuel combustion, followed by aerosols (particulate matter in the atmosphere) and cement manufacture. Other factors, including land use, ozone depletion, animal agriculture and deforestation, are also of concern in the roles they play - both separately and in conjunction with other factors - in affecting climate.

2. What are you going to do with all your research your gathering? Why did you decide to research in Churchill? What makes you so interested in global warming?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:03 PM , Anonymous 4- Courtney Howe said...

1. Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem are effects or processes derived from human activity that affects the ecosystem drastically. Ecosystems are constantly being destroyed by human activity. For example, polution is the most evident example of human impact. Another change on ecosystems caused by humans is deforestation, which is the constantly a problem because humans are cutting down too many trees.

2. QUESTIONS:
1)How deep is oil under the surface of the ice regions or ice sheets?

2)If oil is found will they be able to drill there due to national parks or will it be closed for mining?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:03 PM , Anonymous 1-Maseah Rasta said...

Blog 5

1. Antropogenic is defined as factors of human activity that change the enviroment and influence climate. Thus, "anthropogenic changes in an ecosystem" is another way of saying,changes of human activity, that change the enviroment and influence climate, in an ecosystem. An example of this would be the burning of fossil fuels.

2. -Are there any additional unknown factors to consider when taking the samples?
-What must I do in case of emergence? Such as, being seperated from my group, taking too much or too little samples, or encountering a wild animal?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:09 PM , Anonymous 1-hayden crosby said...

1) Anthropogenic changes are what humans are doing or producing to effect the ecosystem such as air polution.

2) a. What are you looking for in the snow that your collecting for data that shows anthropgenic changes?

b. Was there much of a difference in your data once you changed locations?

 
At February 17, 2009 at 11:21 PM , Anonymous 3- Nick Mayer said...

1. Anthropogenic changes to an ecosystem are any un-natural processes or materials that were set in place through human activities. One example of anthropogenic changes to an ecosystem is: the release of gases or dust from Industry, into the atmosphere.
2. a. Why doesn't Shell, hire their employees to find alternatives and research and improve upon renewable resources for energy, but use company profit to examine damages done by their profit?
b. Do Shell employees get gas ( fossil fuels ) at a discounted rate?
Nick Mayer

 
At February 18, 2009 at 1:27 PM , Anonymous 3- Daniel Cespedes said...

1.Anthropogenic i think thats the word anyway this is a man made change. in this case a change in weather. an example the deforestation in different places.
2. Have you seen any of the things you expected to see? any northern lights?
Has the trip been ahrder than you expected is it physically challenging?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 2:17 PM , Anonymous 5-Emilio Fuentes said...

1)anthropogenic changes are changes caused by humans. one example is the ocean. we are changing it and the ecosystem in/around it.

2)a.how did you prepare for this
trip?
b.what inspired you to pursue this
trip?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 2:42 PM , Anonymous 4-Morgan Sears said...

Blog Challenge #5
1. An “anthropogenic change on an ecosystem” is effects, processes, objects, or materials that are derived from human activities, as opposed to those occurring in natural environments without human influences. An example of anthropogenic change is global warming. Humans burning coal and creating fossil fuels, which created a man made hole in the ozone layer.

2. Question #1: Why do you and your team have to forty-four core samples from your work site?
Question #2: If you take forty-five versus forty-four or forty-three samples, will that mess your results up? What do the samples tell you about global warming?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 2:43 PM , Anonymous 4-Morgan Sears said...

Blog Challenge #5
1. An “anthropogenic change on an ecosystem” is effects, processes, objects, or materials that are derived from human activities, as opposed to those occurring in natural environments without human influences. An example of anthropogenic change is global warming. Humans burning coal and creating fossil fuels, which created a man made hole in the ozone layer.

2. Question #1: Why do you and your team have to forty-four core samples from your work site?
Question #2: If you take forty-five versus forty-four or forty-three samples, will that mess your results up? What do the samples tell you about global warming?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 3:38 PM , Anonymous 1- Kelli Burbridge said...

1. anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem means that it is caused or influenced by humans. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide is that portion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that is produced directly by human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, rather than by such processes as respiration and decay.

2. Do you think that the Ice and the Glaciers will ever melt completely in the poles?

What is you most favorite research project trip you have ever been on?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 6:19 PM , Anonymous 4-sarah anderson said...

1.Anthropogenic changes of an ecosystem are changes from fossil fuel combustion, a land change that leads to more CO2 in the atmosphere.

2. Do you think the harsh climate of the area being studied may alter the information and data collected due to personal error, etc?

How does the snow show changes in climate?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 7:16 PM , Anonymous 3 - McKenzie Campagna said...

I was way too sick to answer these questions! (I was throwing up everything, even water, so I had to go to the hospital for an IV. So I could not get on the computer until today)

1. Artifical changes to the ecosystem....adding CO2 to the atmosphere by driving a vehicle.
2. Where you surprised by the data collected from the Ice Core samples? Also...did you see the shapes of snowflakes from analyzing them? What did they look like?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 7:56 PM , Anonymous 4-whitney staeb said...

1. Anthropogenic factors are human activities that change the environment. Human activities can greatly affect an ecosystem as we are now seeing with global warming.
2. Why is Shell, a gas company, paying for a study on the climate changes when fossil fuels are proposed to be a main cause of global warming?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 8:11 PM , Anonymous Ana carrete- period 2 said...

1)Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem means that it is us the humans that are responsible for the changes of the ecosystem.
EX: When we litter, and through things on the ground we are polluting the atmosphere more and more.
2)
question #1) How come is there so many different types of snow, and what does that show about the erea?

question #2) What is the most intresting data you have found so far?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 9:32 PM , Anonymous 4 - Max Axline said...

1) Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem are caused or influenced by humans. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide is that portion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that is produced directly by human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, rather than by such processes as respiration and decay.

2) Why is shell studying the affect that their oil and other products have on the enviroment?

If they do get some results back that are against their products will they try and change for the better or will they just ignore it?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 9:33 PM , Anonymous 4 - Max Axline said...

1) Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem caused or influenced by humans. Anthropogenic carbon dioxide is that portion of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that is produced directly by human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, rather than by such processes as respiration and decay.

2) Why is shell studying the affect that their oil and otherproducts have on the enviroment?

If they do get some results back that are against their products will they try and change for the better or will they just ignore it?

 
At February 18, 2009 at 10:49 PM , Anonymous 4-tyler roche said...

1.causes ocean acidification which is believed will have negative consequences for marine ecosystems. …
2. are you also collecting ice samples to see if the ice is thinning in certain area's?
what are polar bears going to do if the ice starts melting to soon and the mother bear can't make her hut in the snow for hibernation?

 
At February 19, 2009 at 7:24 AM , Anonymous 1 - Taylor Abramson said...

1. Anthropogenic factors are human activities that change the environment. An example could be the emission of CO2 gases by humans.

2. - Were there noticeable differences in the size of snow at the different locations?
- Where are the samples stored so that they are not distorted while gathering additional samples?

 
At February 19, 2009 at 8:35 AM , Blogger 5-DEREK VERMILLION said...

1.)they are changes in an ecosystem brought on by human activities, an example is whaling or over hunting
2.) how is the work load broken up, do you break up in to small teas and divide the sample gathering or do you work as one big group together?

 
At February 19, 2009 at 7:45 PM , Anonymous 3 - Trenton Hughes said...

Hey Ms. Stafne i hope your adventure is going well and that your having a good time. 1. Anthropogenic changes on an ecosystem are changes for the worse on an ecosystem brought on by humans. One example of this would be humans in general inhabiting the Arctic, bringing all sorts of things that in turn warm the earth. 2. How do you differenciate different types of snow? How old is the snow closest to the ground? on average

 
At February 20, 2009 at 6:50 AM , Anonymous 4- Alana Anderson said...

-Anthropoligic change is the change humans reflect on our ecosystem. An example would be building man-made bays or lakes where there would usually not be one.
-A question i would like to ask would be for the shell inc. teammates. I find it strange that a fossil fuel company would want to study climate change, so my question is, the information gathered on the trip, are you going to put it to good use for researching alternative fossil fuels, or is this just to make your company look good?
-A second question would be for Mr. Pete. Asking how he got into this field of study (climate change) and if he enjoys research trips like these ones.

 

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